Not Married to the Job

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ON LABOR DAY, NEW DATA SHOWS 62% OF WORKERS
FIND IT DIFFICULT TO BALANCE WORK, LIFE & FAMILY

AFM Calls for Divorce, Says Workers Shouldn't Be Married to the Job

Workers Want More Flex-time, Comp-time, and Control Over Work Schedules

2006 Workplace Report

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MERRIFIELD, VA - If you feel like it's getting tougher to balance all the competing pressures of life, you're not alone.  In fact, more than three of every five workers find it difficult to balance work, family and other personal interests, according to new polling data released today by the Alliance for Marriage (AFM). 

American workers were recently asked the question: "How difficult do you find it to balance, work, family life and other personal interests?"*

Difficult

Not Difficult

Workers

62%

38%

Moms

77%

23%

Women ages 18-54

75%

25%

Kids at Home

69%

31%

Homemakers

65%

35%

Dads

61%

39%

The costs of this breakneck speed are steep:  poor mental and physical health, low productivity and morale, and too many kids who don't spend enough time with Mom and Dad, according to the new report:  AFM's Second Annual Report on the Workplace.

"It's not healthy, productive or beneficial when workers are married to the job, and based on this troubling new data, it's time to file for divorce.  We should end this unholy matrimony for the sake of ourselves, our kids and our economy," said Dr. Matt Daniels, President of the Alliance for Marriage.

Workers, AFM, and experts say the solution is a workplace that adapts to workers, not the other way around.  Policies like flex-time, comp-time and counseling are just some of the many ways employers can help workers improve the work-life balance.

Fortunately, offering such policies to workers helps us all:  companies report higher productivity, reduced absenteeism, higher profits and greater retention; children who spend more time with parents are healthier and do better in school; and workers are happier, more productive, and loyal.  A more flexible workplace has other benefits, too, like helping to ease expected labor shortages caused by retiring baby boomers, and ting work stoppages caused by a potential pandemic outbreak, terrorist attack or natural disaster.

"On this Labor Day, the question we're asking employers is simple:  if you're not offering flexible workplace policies, what are you waiting for?   It will be better for your bottom line, better for your employees, and most of all, better for families and children, not to mention our country as whole.  So let's all pledge to make this happen, and soon," said Daniels.

*Polling data based on a national survey by Public Opinion Strategies, August 14-16, 2006. N=800 Likely Voters.  MOE +3.46.